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Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp

Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp is easy, they are the easiest to keep of the dwarf shrimp species and come in a variety of colours. For this reason, they are most suited to the beginner aquarium shrimp keeper. Additionally, they are quite easy to breed and can quite quickly accumulate to very large numbers.

Red Cherry Shrimp

Nowadays, Dwarf aquarium shrimp are very readily available. They have been bred in many different colour variants. Including red, green, black and orange, as well as, yellow, chocolate and even blue.

Yellow Cherry Shrimp

Water Parameters

As previously stated, they are the least demanding of all freshwater aquarium shrimp.

With this in mind, the following values would be classed as suitable for keeping neocaridina shrimp

pH: 6.2 – 7.5
gH: 3-6
kH: 0-4
TDS: 70-500
Temperature: 24-30 deg

Shrimp Aquarium

Above all, keep the aquarium simple.

Firstly, filtration need only consist of a sponge filter or similar so as not to suck the shrimp through. Maintaining the nitrogen cycle is most important for neocaridina shrimp.

Secondly, female shrimp can sometimes be stressed by the males during moulting. For this reason, there should be many hiding spots available. Additionally, it will give places for shrimplets to shelter.

Lastly, a heater to keep the temperature stable.

Feeding

When feeding dwarf aquarium shrimp less is often more. Shrimp will feed off decaying material and biofilm available in the aquarium. In fact, many aquarium keepers do not even directly feed their shrimp. Although, with larger shrimp populations supplemental feeding becomes necessary.

Accordingly, in our home and shop aquariums we feed a varied diet of commercially prepared foods for the most part.

Breeding Neocaridina Shrimp

Evidently, as long as there is a male and female shrimp, they will breed. Females can be distinguished by the deeper body shape. A female will become saddled when mature and ready to breed, this ‘saddle’ is the eggs forming. Subsequently, once fertilised the female will carry the eggs under her tail for 3-4 weeks and generally have approx 20-30 shrimplets each clutch.

Berried Cherry Shrimp

To browse our range of Neocaridina Shrimp CLICK HERE

WATERBOX AQUARIUM DISPLAY JOURNAL

In our retail store, we are always asked about setting up our waterbox display aquariums. So when we started to install our newest waterbox aquarium display we decided to do a build journal, we are asked a lot about what materials are used, how long to grow, what processes involved etc.

Waterbox clear aquarium
Latest Picture Update 9/12/2020

Major Hardware Used

When it comes to equipment, we only use in our display aquariums what we recommend because we want you to know that what you are being recommended works.

Aquarium Display Hardscape

Initially when planning this aquarium display we planned to stock a large amount of Cory catfish and because of their foraging habits an open sandy area was required.

Plant Stocking

When planning this aquarium display we wanted to incorporate quite a few epiphyte type plants. Epiphyte plants attach themselves to hardscape in the aquarium and draw their nutrient directly from the water column. For this reason, its imperative to be fertilising the aquarium regularly.

  • Dwarf Hair Grass.
  • Bucephalandra sp.
  • Micro Java Fern.
  • Pheonix Moss.

Process

Firstly, after assembling the waterbox aquarium cabinet, the clear 2420 display aquarium was moved onto the cabinet. Conveniently, the aquarium comes with levelling foam already incorporated into its base making for a quick and easy assembly, as a result.

The timber used on this aquascape was very buoyant because it has never been in water and its for this reason you can observe that the timber is glued into place. This will also make it more stable while working in the aquarium.

Once cured, the ADA power sand is placed where we require, beneath the soil. We use the power sand advance because it also incorporates ADA Bacter 100, Clear Super and Tourmaline BC. To learn more about the ADA substrate system CLICK HERE.

For the soil, we have chosen to use ADA Amazonia and for the sand ADA La Plata sand because for aquarium display substrates we feel ADA has the best decorative sand. Although, this is entirely personal preference.

 

 

To Keep Updated on This Waterbox Aquarium Display Please be sure to Check-In Regularly

CARBON DIOXIDE IN THE AQUARIUM.

carbon dioxide in the Aquarium

Carbon dioxide use in the aquarium is widely misunderstood by many aspiring hobbyists. Many plants require the higher levels of Co2 for optimum growth because it helps them to take up other nutrients more efficiently also.

Fast growth isn’t the only advantage of carbon dioxide injection. When supplied, plants will exhibit thicker stems, have better colour and show less deficiencies and your aquarium and will have less algae growth.

Most plants grown in the aquarium(submersed) can also grow outside(emersed). When grown emersed the plants have access to the atmospheric co2. In the home aquarium though, the co2 levels are quite low. Plants in non co2 injected aquariums are more reliant on Nitrogen(N), Phosphorus(P) and Potassium(K) and often will show co2 deficiency. As plants are mostly made of carbon it makes sense that supplying them with optimal amounts. This will as a result, equal faster and healthier growth. In a natural submersed environment the co2 levels are quite high because of decomposing organics. Well above the optimal 30ppm.

Gear Required For Co2 Injection.

  • Co2 Cylinder. In our store we offer a ‘swap n go’ option. Cylinders are 2.6kg and on most tanks would expect a couple months, dependent on use.
  • A regulator and solenoid. A regulator controls the amount of co2 and pressure exiting the bottle. Usually it will have a gauge that shows the internal pressure and a gauge that will show the working pressure. A magnetic solenoid is used toter the flow of gas on or off, generally by use of a timer.
  • A form of diffuser/atomiser is required to diffuse the co2 into the water column. Thus, raising co2 levels your aquarium. Diffusers can come in two main forms, In-tank and In-line. In-tank is the most common way used to dissolve the co2. The diffuser is placed where it will receive flow. As a result, disperse the co2 through the aquarium. In-line diffusers are placed in the canister filter return hose. The co2 is diffused directly into the water returning from the filter, making it more efficient.

Note: Many inline diffusers and atomisers require 30psi minimum working pressure. Always ensure to check that your regulator is suitable.

  • Bubble Counter(can be inline or attached to regulator)
  • Co2 tubing.
  • Drop checker
  • Check valve

Co2 Kit Installation

  • 1) Attach regulator to co2 cylinder, ensuring seals are in place and not damaged.
  • 2) Open co2 cylinder tap to release carbon dioxide into regulator. The gauges should now show the working pressure and bottle pressure. Check for any leaks.
  • 3) Connect the bubble counter to the regulator.
  • 4) The co2 tubing can now be joined to the bubble counter and the other end connected to your diffuser of choice.
  • 5) Power on the Solenoid and check that the carbon dioxide is flowing into the aquarium through the diffuser.
  • 6) Always ensure there are no leaks at all joins. This can be checked with a little soapy water.

Setting the Amount of Carbon Dioxide in the Aquarium.

So all equipment is in place and you’re ready to set the amount of carbon dioxide going into the aquarium. There are a couple ways this can be achieved. Firstly it can be determined via the relationship between PH and KH. The optimum co2 levels in the aquarium with high light is 30ppm, although in lower light aquariums 15ppm would be sufficient.

Secondly, a drop checker can be used. Drop checkers work by constantly monitoring the PH of the water inside a vial containing bromothymol blue and 4KH water solution. The solution is relatable to the chart below in determining Co2 levels in the aquarium.

When diffused correctly into water, carbon dioxide will create carbonic acid. The carbonic acid will work against the buffering capacity of the KH(carbonate hardness) in the aquarium. Thus dropping the PH. Consequently, with some attentive checking of PH and KH it can be determined how much carbon dioxide is in the aquarium. As seen in the chart a PH of 6.6 at a KH of 4 you can assume the optimum co2 levels of approx 30ppm. Generally, a 0.2 drop in PH from prior co2 addition to post co2 addition is ideal.

Optimum co2 Levels

Setting the Amount of Time for Co2 Injection.

Plants will uptake most carbon dioxide at the start of the light cycle so it makes sense to be hitting the optimum levels at ‘lights on’. This can be done by timing the amount of time it takes for the co2 to drop the PH in your aquarium by 0.2. If it takes 1hr to do so, the diffusing should start 1 hour prior to the lights coming on. This can be achieved by a simple timer.

As plants will produce co2 and respire oxygen once lights turn off, the co2 needs to be turned off 1hr prior to lights out because this helps prevent oxygen starvation due to co2 levels being elevated.

For Information about Carbon and other deficiencies try this HELPFUL LINK

HOW TO SETUP A MARINE AQUARIUM

Looking at how to set up a Marine Aquarium from the start?

Firstly, take your time and don’t rush installing the marine aquarium. For the first timer we suggest to supply adequate filtration, generally 30% more than a freshwater tank. Coral sand is also important as a natural buffer to maintain and stabilise pH of 8.3

Setting up a Marine Aquarium

BELOW IS WHAT IS REQUIRED WHEN SETTING UP A SALT WATER AQUARIUM:

  • Live Rock.
  • Base Rock.
  • Live sand or coral sand enough to cover the bottom with approx. 2.5cm of sand.
  • Heater 
during the winter.
  • Chiller during the summer.
  • A quality Filter and Protein Skimmer.
  • An internal Wavemaker.
  • RO/DI Filter.
  • Salt, either good quality Artificial Salt or collected Natural Seawater.
  • Refractometer to Measure Salinity.
  • Test kits for Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, Phosphate, PH, Calcium, Alkalinity and Magnesium.
  • A UV Sterilizer can also be helpful.
  • A good quality Lighting System.
  • Aquarium glass cleaner.

Adding Rock and Sand

Place the live rock in first using an open pattern so the fish have room to swim through and hide in the rock. Be as creative as you want during this process and don’t be afraid to go back and change it later. Once the rock is where you like it, you can pour the live sand around the rocks, keeping it at a fairly even thickness throughout the tank. Adding the live sand in will cloud the water, but don’t worry as it will eventually settle and the water will clear.

Cycling your tank

You must then cycle the marine aquarium in order to avoid any livestock death. This can be done by adding live bacteria or may come in on live rock if that is the chosen route for hardscape. If this method is not employed your ammonia and nitrite spike is more severe and lasts longer and sometimes the correct bacteria is not grown.

You must check the ammonia and nitrite levels daily until it drops to zero and your tank starts to produce nitrates. Once the marine aquarium starts to show a nitrate reading and your ammonia and nitrite has dropped to zero you can start adding fish and corals slowly so as not to over populate the system too quickly.

LIVE BACTERIA

The use of live bacteria helps to speed up the process and generally allows the addition of marine life much faster.

When your aquarium has fully completed cycling and you’re confident all water parameters are stable you will be ready to add a small population of fish and coral. Don’t rush this process; take your time to be rewarded in the saltwater hobby.

Make sure to do your homework and research about how to install a marine aquarium and the species of fish and coral you’re thinking of keeping as some fish are known to eat coral, others may require larger volumes of water to be happy etc

IN ORDER OF ADDITION    

  1.   Add base rock and or live rock
  2.  Add Live Bacteria.
  3.  Test parameters
  4.  Add coral
  5.  Confirm parameters
  6.  Add small number of fish (to avoid parasite issues etc its recommended to quarantine new fish)

WATER CHEMISTRY

We need to replicate seawater as closely as possible to have a successful nano reef. The following water parameters represent the acceptable ranges for marine reef aquariums:

Temp23-26° C
Specific Gravity1.025
pH8.2 to 8.4
Alkalinity8 to 12 dKH
Calcium420 to 450 mg/L
Ammonia0
Nitrite0
Nitrate5ppm 
Magnesium1380-1500ppm

WATER CHANGES

In a nano reef setup with minimal ways to export nutrients regular water changes are the most important maintenance task you can do. Water changes help to remove high concentrations of dissolved organic compounds and replenish lost trace elements. You will need a few basic pieces of equipment including a large, clean plastic bucket, an aquarium siphon, a thermometer, a refractometer and salt mix or clean saltwater

You can either make, collect or buy your salt water. To make your salt water follow the manufacturer’s directions to mix your replacement saltwater before you start your water change. In a 100 litre aquarium you will need to change about 15-20 litres of water. Although we do recommend that you have the amount of water on hand that is equal to your tank capacity during the initial stages and as a safety requirement should you need to perform unexpected changes.

For making saltwater for installing the marine aquarium we recommend that you use RO/DI water as the basis for your saltwater mix. Add the indicated amount of salt mix (see manufacturers instructions) After adding the salt mix drop your extra powerhead into the bucket and plug it in. Add a heater if necessary to bring the temp up to the 24-26C range. Let the powerhead run overnight to thoroughly mix the salt.

EVAPORATION

Your tank water will evaporate. Different tanks will evaporate at different levels, we recommend that you top up your tank with RO water and to keep the salinity stable an auto top off system is recomended, you should NOT use tap water to top up.

Test the water for specific gravity using a Refractometer. The specific gravity should be between 1.021-1.026 and should match the specific gravity of the aquarium water. Adjust the specific gravity if necessary by adding RO/DI water to lower it or by adding salt mix to raise it.

FILTER AND POWERHEAD MAINTENANCE

Your pumps will need to be cleaned every month or so. Most powerheads / canister filters and pumps come apart easily so you can clean the impeller, filter pads etc.

Thanks for reading about How to set up a Marine Aquarium.

HOW TO SET UP A SIMPLE FRESHWATER AQUARIUM

There are a lot of options for setting up a freshwater aquarium, with many different sizes and lots of different equipment that can be used. An ideal beginner aquarium is one of the new ‘all in one’ aquariums made by a number of manufacturers. These come with lights and filters built into the aquarium and are easy to set up. If you are going to keep tropical fish then you will need to purchase a heater as well.

How to set up a freshwater aquarium
How to set up a Freshwater Aquarium

BASIC EQUIPMENT LIST 

Here is what is needed for installing a freshwater Aquarium. Your local pet or aquarium store can provide you with the right advice when you are deciding what to buy:

WHERE TO PUT THE AQUARIUM 

A low traffic, quiet area out of direct sunlight is best. Do not put your tank in front of or near a heater or cooler, as it leads to temperature fluctuations which will stress the fish. Your tank should be placed near an electricity point so that you can plug in your heater and filters easily. Your power point should also be on an Earth leakage circuit breaker.

Ensure that your tank is sitting on a suitable tank stand or base and a floor that will support the weight of the tank. Make sure that the stand is level, with a sheet of polyfoam or similar under the tank.

Installing a FRESHWATER AQUARIUM

STEP 1
CLEAN OUT YOUR NEW TANK WITH TAP WATER ONLY. DO NOT USE ANY SORT OF CHEMICALS OR SOAPS. USING SOAPS CAN LEAVE RESIDUES ON THE GLASS AND HARM FISH ONCE THEY GO INTO THE TANK.
STEP 2
WASH THE GRAVEL THOROUGHLY WITH TAP WATER IN A BUCKET. RINSE IT UNTIL ALL THE DUST IS RINSED OFF. PLACE INTO THE AQUARIUM UP TO A DEPTH OF 1 TO 2 CM, IF YOU ARE USING AN UNDER GRAVEL FILTER THEN 5CM.
STEP 3
RINSE ORNAMENTS (ROCKS, DRIFTWOOD ETC ) WITH TAP WATER AND PLACE CAREFULLY INTO AQUARIUM.
STEP 4
INSTALL ALL OF YOUR ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT E.G. HEATER, FILTER AND AIR PUMPS. CAUTION DO NOT TURN ON YOUR EQUIPMENT UNTIL THERE IS FreshWATER IN THE Aquarium AND YOUR HANDS ARE OUT.
STEP 5
NOW YOU CAN FILL YOUR TANK WITH WATER. AN EASY WAY TO DO THIS WHILE AVOIDING MESSING UP YOUR ORNAMENTS, IS BY PLACING A PLATE INTO THE BOTTOM OF THE TANK AND POURING WATER OVER THE TOP. ADD WATER CONDITIONER TO REMOVE TOXINS IN THE TAP WATER, AND ADJUST PH AND WATER HARDNESS TO SUIT YOUR FISH’S NEEDS
STEP 6
YOU CAN THEN PLUG ALL ELECTRICAL ELEMENTS INTO THE POWER POINTS AND TURN THEM ON. ALLOW THE AQUARIUM TIME TO HEAT UP, BEFORE ADDING PLANTS AND CYCLING YOUR TANK FOR FISH. THIS USUALLY TAKES 12—24 HOURS.
STEP 7
BEFORE INTRODUCING YOUR FISH, TEST YOUR WATER CONDITIONS USING YOUR TEST KITS. MAKE SURE THAT YOUR AMMONIA IS 0. REMEMBER TO KEEP THE PH SLIGHTLY ACID (6.8-7.0) WHILE CYCLING YOUR TANK AS IT REDUCES THE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA. DO NOT INTRODUCE FISH UNTIL THE WATER CONDITIONS ARE CORRECT (SEE BELOW FOR TIPS ON HOW TO CORRECT THEM IF THEY ARE NOT RIGHT WHEN YOU TEST).

Cycling a new tank

No matter what type of filter you use, ‘good’ bacteria will need to colonise it, in order to remove toxic waste products such as ammonia from the water. This process is called nitrification or biological filtration. Newly set up freshwater aquariums and filters will not have these bacteria and it can take several weeks to establish a fully functioning biological filter. During this time ammonia or nitrite can build up to toxic levels causing stress, disease or death. Therefore it is important that you do not overstock the tank. Problems can be reduced by:

  • Gradually building up the population of fish over 4 to 5 weeks.
  • Use live plants – these can absorb some of the toxic products directly from the water.
  • Only feed the fish sparingly – once every 2day to reduce the amount of ammonia produced.
  • Test ammonia and nitrite levels – water change as needed.
  • Keep pH slightly acid 6.8-7.0 as it reduces the toxicity of ammonia.
  • Use Quick Start, Dr Tims one and only, Startsmart or similar products to boost nitrifying bacteria levels.

New Tank Syndrome – The Nitrogen Cycle

Ammonia is the main waste product from fish or uneaten food that will ‘poison’ fish. Ammonia will damage gills and is a ‘neurotoxin’ affecting the brain. Special bacteria called Nitrifying bacteria are able to manage this waste via a process called Nitrification or the Nitrogen Cycle. It is essential to establish this process when installing a freshwater aquarium to prevent ammonia building up to toxic levels.

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HOW TO HATCH BABY BRINE SHRIMP

Hatching Baby Brine Shrimp(BBS) is often required as a first food for many tropical and marine fish and are very easy to hatch at home with minimal cost and effort. Brine shrimp are most useful and nutritious in the first 12 hours after hatching.

Hatching Baby Brine Shrimp
Hatching Baby Brine Shrimp Tips

What is needed-

HATCHING PROCESS

Attach the airline tubing and valve to the bottom of the hatching vessel as shown in the picture (a 2L soft drink bottle works well).

Connect the airline valve to a suitable air pump with the airline tubing.

Firstly, fill the Hatching Vessel with 1.5L of dechlorinated tap water and add 1tbsp of salt, allowing it to dissolve, turn on the air to the salt solution to create a gentle bubble and add 1/2tsp brine shrimp eggs. Secondly, adjust the amount of air to the hatching vessel to keep the eggs in a constant suspension. Thirdly, after approx 18hrs at 27 degrees celcius the eggs will have hatched, apparent from the slight orange tinge to the water.

HARVESTING

Turn off the air at the valve in preparation to harvest. Shine a light towards the bottom of the hatching vessel to attract the baby brine shrimp. Using a small piece of airline, siphon the brine shrimp out into a sieve. It is at this point they are ready to be fed to baby fish.

Generally all fish will take BBS as a first food without hassle. At times i have found myself with no hatched brine shrimp but freezing some brine shrimp in ice cube trays is a good way around this in a pinch or alternatively Ocean Nutrition have a product called Instant baby brine which i have also found a great product to keep on hand for those ‘just in case’ times.

Any questions please shoot us an email or call the store, myself or my staff are always happy to help.

For more information about the life cycle of Artemia Brine Shrimp CLICK HERE

Heres a quick video of the process

AQUARIUM FISH FEEDING GUIDE

In this aquarium fish feeding guide we will touch upon what foods your fish will benefit from and their uses in the hobby. As always, fish, just like all living creatures will benefit from a well rounded diet.

Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide
Aquarium Fish Foods

TYPES OF FOODS

  • Live food
  • Freeze dried food
  • Frozen food
  • Pellet food
  • Flake food

LIVE FOOD

Feeding live aquarium fish food can have its drawbacks with fish becoming fussy and can also be a vessel for parasites to enter the aquarium. In the industry it can also be a heated topic whether its really required. The benefits of feeding live foods though are definitely apparent. Firstly, as a spawning trigger live food can be a very valuable tool to use. Secondly, feeding live food can be great for inciting a feeding response from fussy eaters. Types of live foods include Blackworms, Bloodworms, Earthworms, Brine Shrimp, Insects, Feeder Shrimp/Crayfish and Live Feeder Fish.

FREEZE DRIED FOOD

Freeze dried food has the advantage of being very clean and free of parasites. Being devoid of moisture also means it can be a great vessel for soaking up medications to feed to the fish, thus, making the medications more effective. Examples of freeze dried foods are Freeze Dried Blackworms, Bloodworms, Tubifex Worms and Insects.

FROZEN FOOD

Frozen aquarium fish food comes in many types and varieties. Daphnia, Copepods and Baby Brine Shrimp for fish fry and nano sized fish. Mosquito Larvae, Brine shrimp, bloodworms, Mysis Shrimp for small to medium fish as well as larger Shrimp, Fish and Molluscs for larger fish. There is most likely a frozen fish food to suit almost every feeding situation.

In our store we feed and recommend OCEAN NUTRITION frozen fish food

COMMERCIALLY FORMULATED FLAKE AND PELLETISED FOOD

By far the most popular food in the aquarium keeping industry are dry flakes and pellets. They can come in many formulations aimed at many differing diets required by individual species requirements. Vegetable Flakes and pellets for herbivorous fish, Omnivorous flakes and pellets for, you guessed it, omniorous fish. Lastly, Carnivorous flakes and pellets for carnivores.

The forms can also be quite variable. Micro pellets for the smallest of fish up to large pellets and sticks for tank buster fish.

Commercially aquarium fish foods are often made to include colour enhancers and vitamins to boost health and promote colours. Always check that the foods are made from quality ingredients.

In our store we feed and recommend OCEAN NUTRITION flakes and Pellets

FEEDING FREQUENCY

For every aquarium it is imperative to understand that everything that goes into the aquarium stays in the aquarium, in some shape or form, until it removed by partial water changes. When feeding aquarium fish always only feed as much as the fish can eat within a couple minutes. Uneaten food is very detrimental to water quality in the aquarium. Also note that young growing fish may require more feeds per day than lager adult fish for them grow well and at an even growth rate.

Thankyou for reading our aquarium fish feeding guide.

WELCOME TO OUR ARTICLES AND INFORMATION AREA.

Here you will find helpful and useful articles and information for aquariums relating to all things Aquatic. Our aim is to share our knowledge and experiences with you all in hopes to help guide you into maintaining a successful, thriving aquarium you can enjoy.

Freshwater Planted Aquarium
Shop Display at Arcy Aquariums Created by Ross Merker

Hatching Baby Brine Shrimp

Baby brine shrimp is the starting food for many species of fish fry. they can be fed when newly hatched or grown to larger shrimp to be fed as a live food which can help induce spawning.

Click Here to read more aquarium articles and information about how to hatch Artemia brine shrimp cysts.

Hatching Baby Brine Shrimp

How To Setup a Basic Freshwater Aquarium

We all start somewhere right? Sometimes just jumping in and getting your hands wet is the best way to learn. Here you can find the information and articles needed for setting up a freshwater aquarium.

Click Here to Learn more


Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide

In this aquarium fish feeding guide we will touch upon what foods your fish will benefit from and their uses in the hobby. As always, fish, just like all living creatures will benefit from a well rounded diet.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide


 

Carbon Dioxide In The Aquarium

Carbon dioxide use in the aquarium is widely misunderstood by many aspiring hobbyists. Many plants require the higher levels of Co2 for optimum growth because it helps them to take up other nutrients more efficiently also.

Fast growth isn’t the only advantage of carbon dioxide injection. When supplied, plants will exhibit thicker stems, have better colour and show less deficiencies and your aquarium and will have less algae growth.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Co2 in the aquarium

 


Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide

In this aquarium fish feeding guide we will touch upon what foods your fish will benefit from and their uses in the hobby. As always, fish, just like all living creatures will benefit from a well rounded diet.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide


 

Setting up a Marine Aquarium

 


Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp

Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp is easy, they are the easiest to keep of the dwarf shrimp species and come in a variety of colours. For this reason, they are most suited to the beginner aquarium shrimp keeper. Additionally, they are quite easy to breed and can quite quickly accumulate to very large numbers, for this reason.

Nowadays, Dwarf aquarium shrimp are very readily available. They have been bred in many different colour variants. Including red, green, black and orange, as well as, yellow, chocolate and even blue.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Red Cherry Shrimp For Sale

 


Carbon Dioxide In The Aquarium

Carbon dioxide use in the aquarium is widely misunderstood by many aspiring hobbyists. Many plants require the higher levels of Co2 for optimum growth because it helps them to take up other nutrients more efficiently also.

Fast growth isn’t the only advantage of carbon dioxide injection. When supplied, plants will exhibit thicker stems, have better colour and show less deficiencies and your aquarium and will have less algae growth.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Co2 in the aquarium

 


Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide

In this aquarium fish feeding guide we will touch upon what foods your fish will benefit from and their uses in the hobby. As always, fish, just like all living creatures will benefit from a well rounded diet.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide


 

How to set up a freshwater aquarium

 


How To Setup a Marine Aquarium

Ever wanted a slice of the reef in your own home? It may be easier than you think! Many aquarists feel overwhelmed by the marine side of the hobby when in fact it really isn’t as hard as they imagined. There is multitudes of great information and articles surrounding the reef aquarium hobby.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Setting up a Marine Aquarium

 


Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp

Keeping Neocaridina Shrimp is easy, they are the easiest to keep of the dwarf shrimp species and come in a variety of colours. For this reason, they are most suited to the beginner aquarium shrimp keeper. Additionally, they are quite easy to breed and can quite quickly accumulate to very large numbers, for this reason.

Nowadays, Dwarf aquarium shrimp are very readily available. They have been bred in many different colour variants. Including red, green, black and orange, as well as, yellow, chocolate and even blue.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Red Cherry Shrimp For Sale

 


Carbon Dioxide In The Aquarium

Carbon dioxide use in the aquarium is widely misunderstood by many aspiring hobbyists. Many plants require the higher levels of Co2 for optimum growth because it helps them to take up other nutrients more efficiently also.

Fast growth isn’t the only advantage of carbon dioxide injection. When supplied, plants will exhibit thicker stems, have better colour and show less deficiencies and your aquarium and will have less algae growth.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Co2 in the aquarium

 


Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide

In this aquarium fish feeding guide we will touch upon what foods your fish will benefit from and their uses in the hobby. As always, fish, just like all living creatures will benefit from a well rounded diet.

CLICK HERE for more Info

Aquarium Fish Feeding Guide